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ASUS ROG Swift 360Hz PG259QNR Review
Review By @ 11:17am 31/03/21

Product: ASUS ROG Swift 360Hz PG259QNR
Type: Gaming Display (24.5”)
Price: $1,249 AUD
Availability: Out Now
Link: ASUS PG259QNR product page

Displays are often designed for different purposes, and at a glance this can be gleaned from taking a look at the overall screen-size, resolution, and refresh rate. Naturally, this sees gaming displays in the PC space favour the latter where technologies like NVIDIA G-Sync paired with fast refresh-rates can result in some of the smoothest presentation you’re likely to see.

And that’s smooth as in once you experience it for the first time, it’s just about impossible to go back. Even in the gaming display space there are differences -- screens designed and optimised for the various games we all play versus those that might simply go for size or ultrawide immersion.

The ASUS ROG Swift 360Hz PG259QNR is best described as a display for the competitive scene -- professional or amateur across titles like League of Legends, Dota 2, Valorant, Fortnite, Call of Duty: Warzone, Overwatch, Rainbow Six Siege or any other title where regional tournaments occur frequently. In other words this effort from ASUS (with a panel co-developed by NVIDIA and AU Optronics) could be summed up as “for esports”.

But even that doesn’t quite tell the full picture, where in addition to the crisp and impressive 360Hz 1080p IPS panel, that also supports HDR-10, you also get access to NVIDIA Reflex via the included NVIDIA Reflex Latency Analyzer tool to both monitor and help reduce input latency in supported titles.

Looking Good




With a screen-size of 24.5-inches, the sturdy and compact form factor of the ASUS ROG Swift 360Hz has a premium feel with that Republic of Gamers style that is par for the course when it comes to the name. Angular, subtle, and sleek -- and something that wouldn't look out of place on a typical desk. Compared to other displays the screen real-estate here is relatively small at 24.5-inches (well, in 2021 that is) but the desktop presence is anything but small -- it’s solid, sturdy, and then some. Plus, the full vertical tilt is a welcome touch.

The first thing you do notice though comes directly from naming this display the Swift 360Hz. Which of course points to the IPS panel featuring a somewhat incredible 360Hz refresh rate and a reported 1 ms GTG response time. In the age of the 144Hz panel falling under the “super fast” category one would naturally begin to wonder why there’d be a need to go all the way up to 360Hz.


In addition to the crisp and impressive 360Hz 1080p IPS panel, that also supports HDR-10, you also get access to NVIDIA Reflex via the included NVIDIA Reflex Latency Analyzer tool to both monitor and help reduce input latency in supported titles.



Also, is there PC hardware out there that can run games at, well, 360 frames-per-second?

The answer to that ties in nicely with the esports and competitive side of the display -- the latest GeForce RTX 3080 has no issue pushing Blizzard’s Overwatch past 360fps on Ultra Quality settings at 1080p -- the native resolution of the ASUS ROG Swift 360Hz PG259QNR. Paired with G-Sync and NVIDIA itself overseeing the design and build of the panel used here, and the almost overkill 360Hz begins to make sense.



As for the in-game benefit that comes from a higher refresh rate, the difference comes into play when dealing with fast moving characters, images, and fast camera pans. In the case of Overwatch that could be Tracer dashing across the screen or with CS:Go someone on the opposing team running past a small alleyway you’re creeping up through. More frames and a higher refresh-rate results in a cleaner and clearer image that makes it easier to aim and shoot at a moving target. This is not to say that with this display your skill level will rise through the ranks thanks to technology alone -- but it wouldn’t hurt.

I managed to go hands-on with this display back at CES 2020 where NVIDIA had it setup alongside a 60Hz display where the challenge was to see how many fast moving targets you could shoot in a straightforward test. On the 60Hz panel I got 1 out of 10, on the ASUS ROG Swift 360Hz that became 7 out of 10. No doubt after 144Hz there are diminishing returns but there’s no denying that in the competitive space hardware and player performance go hand-in-hand.

It’s All in The Reflex




NVIDIA Reflex is built around the idea of reducing the time taken between the pressing of a mouse button and an action being visible or “happening” on screen. At various resolutions and refresh rates and even across different titles and different hardware configurations -- measuring system latency can vary wildly.


As for the in-game benefit that comes from a higher refresh rate, the difference comes into play when dealing with fast moving characters, images, and fast camera pans.



The flow is starting the hypothetical clock at the time of input and then measuring how long it takes for the CPU/GPU and rendering to do it’s thing. For most out there system latency is imperceptible, and that thing we called ‘input lag’ being something we’ve all adjusted to in the past. For competitive games and players, it’s an area that is as important as refresh-rates, response times, the types of peripherals used, and the calibration that goes into a setup.
ASUS ROG Swift 360Hz PG259QNR Specs
  • Maximum Resolution: 1920 x 1080 (FHD)
  • Size: 27-inch
  • Panel Type: IPS
  • Refresh Rate: 360 Hz (G-Sync compatible)
  • Response Time (GTG): 1ms
  • Contrast Ratio: 1000:1 (Native)
  • Brightness: 400 cd/㎡
  • Weight: 6.05 kg

Also you don’t need a GeForce RTX 30 series graphics card nor the ASUS ROG Swift 360Hz PG259QNR to make use of NVIDIA Reflex -- the naming refers to a mix of hardware, software, and tools. NVIDIA Reflex as seen in titles like Fortnite and Destiny 2 can be enabled in the settings and comes as a part of the latest NVIDIA Game Ready drivers supporting the many NVIDIA GeForce GPUs out there.


But as we’re looking at the ASUS ROG Swift 360Hz, which comes equipped with an integrated NVIDIA Reflex Latency Analyzer, let’s break down how that side of it works. Basically there’s a port on the back of the display where you connect a compatible mouse (for this review we were supplied a ROG Chakram Core) and then the time between the pressing of the left mouse button and the relative on-screen area lighting up or changing is measured -- something that works as an overlay so you can check out the various latencies between games. So basically you set the rectangle to hover around a gun’s muzzle-flash or any area where left-clicking updates the image.

During our time with the ASUS ROG Swift 360Hz PG259QNR and testing the latency to monitor the difference between titles we were able to test with both the GeForce RTX 3080 and the GeForce RTX 3060 -- and found that NVIDIA Reflex made the most different in titles that weren’t bottlenecked by the CPU. For 1080p this means the benefits were far greater and noticeable with the 3060 versus the 3080. Which is actually a good thing in the sense that more mainstream GPUs will be utilised by most people out there.

A View to Remember




NVIDIA Reflex is a fascinating bit of tech, especially when paired with a display that comes equipped with NVIDIA Reflex Latency Analyzer -- as you can see the direct results when messing about with detail settings and turning the feature on and off in-game.

Latency is of course a catch-all term that covers every little hardware bit found inside a PC so it makes sense that when the bulk of game processing is being handled by the GPU then NVIDIA’s technology can cut that time by a substantial amount. Also, with ASUS ROG Swift 360Hz’s, err, 360Hz display this means using a GPU to hit higher frame-rates on a high-end panel does result in low-latency.


NVIDIA Reflex is a fascinating bit of tech, especially when paired with a display that comes equipped with NVIDIA Reflex Latency Analyzer -- as you can see the direct results when messing about with detail settings and turning the feature on and off in-game.



Which means with or without Reflex, the ASUS ROG Swift 360Hz is impressive. Seeing how smooth games can look when pushing 200fps and higher is something you wouldn’t think you’d notice -- but in fast moving titles and shooters it’s something of a game changer. And if you’re coming from a 60Hz display, well, the difference is stunning.

As for the display itself, the IPS panel features both a wide viewing angle and 10-bit colour-space with plenty of options to adjust and tailor the image to suit any number of activities. The brightness may be more entry level at HDR-400 though the results are fine for most cinematic gaming. That said the reason to look at the ASUS ROG Swift 360Hz PG259QNR would be for what it does best -- competitive performance.

Choosing the right display not only for your build but also the games you play is important -- and if you’re all about the competitive scene then the arrival of NVIDIA Reflex is definitely something to take note of. And with full NVIDIA Reflex integration, and its combination of hardware and software that comes together, the ASUS ROG Swift 360Hz becomes perhaps the ultimate in competitive or esports displays. A 360Hz refresh-rate, G-Sync, NVIDIA Reflex Latency Analyzer, a vibrant and responsive IPS panel designed in part by NVIDIA, excellent build quality and features, and great software and driver support from both NVIDIA and ASUS.
What we liked
Incredible 360Hz panel
NVIDIA Reflex Latency Analyzer is a fascinating tool for measuring latency in games
Vibrant colours
Great build quality
What we didn't like
HDR not quite at the level expected of the price point
We gave it:
9.0
OUT OF 10
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