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Post by KostaAndreadis @ 05:09pm 14/02/20 | 2 Comments
Drives designed for NAS (Network Attached Storage) devices not only come in large sizes but also sit next to each other to create massive amounts of storage potential. From 2, 4, 6, all the way up to 16TB in a single drive that when multiplied means you can effectively become your own Netflix or Steam. Or simply, you know, be able to store everything (including games) in a single location.

As per our full review of the Seagate IronWolf NAS Hard Drive range.
With the spindle speed of 7,200 RPM using CrystalDiskMark to measure the overall speeds of the Seagate IronWolf drives in our possession we were pleased to see the advertised speeds of 210MB/s be a little conservative with results closer to the 225MB/s mark. This handily beats the larger capacity BarraCuda drives from Seagate – though of course, going IronWolf carries with it a larger cost. With decent speeds for a non-SSD unit, being able to add something in the range of 20TB of extra storage to your rig or home network is, well, amazing. Not exactly a thing most people would want, but if you run a Plex media server or access a huge Steam of GOG library across a few devices there’s a reason to NAS it up.

Click Here to Read Our Full Seagate IronWolf Hard Drive Review



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Latest Comments
trog
Posted 08:12pm 03/3/20
Max Sustained Transfer Rate OD: 210MB/s <--- what is considered 'sustained'?
fpot
Posted 07:26am 05/3/20
From wiki -

The sustained data transfer rate or sustained throughput of a drive will be the lower of the sustained internal and sustained external rates. The sustained rate is less than or equal to the maximum or burst rate because it does not have the benefit of any cache or buffer memory in the drive. The internal rate is further determined by the media rate, sector overhead time, head switch time, and cylinder switch time.


To be honest I'm not really sure if that makes any sense.

I just bought an 8TB Ironwolf after thinking my old WD was on the fritz but turns out its fine. Oh well can never have enough storage.
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