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Post by Steve Farrelly @ 05:22pm 17/08/16 | 0 Comments
At this year's Gamescom we had a chance ahead of the show proper to take on one of For Honor's competitive multiplayer game modes -- Objective. A point capture beast that boasts 4v4 with huge numbers of AI, earnable "Feats" and an all-important "Revenge" system.

Here's a snippet from our hands-on:
This could all be the product of not playing enough of the game to fully grasp the intricate balance of all the systems though. However, I did play for an hour on a single mode called Objective, which is a Domination-styled 4v4 multiplayer offering with three capture points -- two (A and C) flanking a single, heavily AI populated lane (B). AI are a filler concept, and based on the tide of the match, it will either be your friendlies or the enemy who flood the lane. They’re also a kind of XP and health currency. You can also gain health for standing in a captured area, and you’ll earn twice as many points for populating a captured point, and defending it. In Objective, you can also revive downed players and you’ll earn Feats (like kill streak rewards) for what the team is calling Renown, which is basically being one of the better players on the field of battle.

We had a chance to play as one character from all three factions -- Knights, Samurai and Vikings with mostly heavies on offer, as well as the Samurai’s Orochi class, which is essentially a more nimble assassin. You have endless run regardless of the archetype you play, and you can use the environment to your advantage. The Viking Warlord for example can run at their opponent and if timed correctly, you can grab them, lift them off the ground and essentially spear tackle them into the environment. Some spiked walls make this a dangerous move if you’re in the wrong position, while being anywhere near a ledge when a Warlord comes gunning for you could be one of your worst mistakes. Each character has the ability to use the environment in unique ways like this, and once the game is out in the wild it’s going to be interesting to see just how the community starts to utilise this ulterior form of offense.
Click here for our full, in-depth hands-on with For Honor's multiplayer.



gamescomhands-on2016competitive multiplayerfor honorubisoft





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