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Post by Dan @ 09:51am 17/12/13 | 1 Comments
The Australian Classification Board has issued a media release explaining that they have completed reviewing the initial MA15+ ratings given to 12 games that had been contested by South Australian Attorney-General John Rau, who was of the opinion that they had been rated too low in contrast to decisions made in International markets. All 12 of the original MA15+ ratings have been retained:
The Review Board upheld the MA 15+ (Mature Accompanied) classification for all of the 12 computer games. These titles are: Killer is Dead, Alien Rage, Tom Clancy’s Splinter Cell Blacklist, Deadly Premonition the Director’s Cut, Company of Heroes 2, God Mode, Borderlands 2: Add-on Content Pack, Fuse, Deadpool, The Walking Dead, Gears of War: Judgment and The Walking Dead: Survival Instinct.

In reviewing the classifications, the Review Board worked within the framework of the National Classification Scheme, applying the provisions of the Classification (Publications, Films and Computer Games) Act 1995, the National Classification Code and the Guidelines for the Classification of Computer Games. This is the same framework used by the Classification Board.

The Review Board is an independent merits review body. It makes a fresh classification decision upon receipt of an application for review. This Review Board decisions takes the place of the original decisions made by the Classification Board.
In a statement following the original announcement of the review, Ron Curry -- CEO of Australian games industry body The Interactive Games and Entertainment Association (IGEA) -- posited that the classification process usually costs approximately $28,000 per decision, suggesting that this futile exercise has likely cost the Australian taxpayer around $336,000.

South Australian Attorney-General John Rau has also previously advocated for the complete removal of the MA15+ rating, describing it as "like a crossover point between what is acceptable and what is unacceptable".



classificationr18+australia





Latest Comments
Phandaal
Posted 05:13pm 17/12/13
Brought to you by the same liars who devised the "Gambling starts with games" adverts.

Take Rau to court and garnish the pricks salary until the money is repaid.

If he had brought a lawsuit against someone and lost he would have to pay for costs. This is no different.
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