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Sea of Thieves
Sea of Thieves

Xbox One
Genre: Adventure
Developer: Rare Official Site: https://www.seaofthieves.com/
Publisher: Microsoft Classification: TBC
Release Date:
February 2017
Thursday, 23 November 2017
Post by KostaAndreadis @ 01:21pm 23/11/17 | 1 Comments
Sign up for the Sea of Thieves Technical Alpha program between now and December 1 to guarantee early access to one of 2018's most anticipated Xbox and Windows 10 releases - Sea of Thieves! The move comes as Rare prepares to open the shared online experience to its largest audience yet. So yeah, what are you waiting for?


Oh right, a link. We'll here it is, the Sea of Thieves Insider Programme page where you'll need to use your Xbox Live account to answer a short survey as part of the process. The only restriction is that you need to be at least 18 years of age.
Wednesday, 22 November 2017
Post by KostaAndreadis @ 02:29pm 22/11/17 | 0 Comments
Recently I got to play Sea of Thieves for the very first time. And what immediately stood out was just how different it was to anything I’d played before. And afterwards I had the opportunity to chat at length with Rare's Joe Neate about the game. So pull up a chair, pour some grog, adjust your eye patches, and enjoy this interview with Rare about all things Sea of Thieves.


AusGamers: With studios that have been around for a while people assume that it's the same people that are there after 20 years or more, but that's not how the industry works. I'm assuming the culture at Rare was established a long time ago, but Sea of Thieves feels different to just about everything we’ve seen before.

Joe Neate: Rare has been around for 32 years now and it's a studio that has always grown and evolved to kind of look at what new trends are emerging in the industry or kind of where player tastes are going and almost changing what they make and what they do to meet that. If Rare did just make the same stuff over and over they probably wouldn't still be around. Because player trends change, and player tastes change, I think what has always stayed true to Rare is that every game they make reflects the people who worked on it. So, the team's sense of humour, the culture of the studio, the values that Rare has. And so, every Rare game that you've grown up playing will have had a sense of humour, and it would have made you smile, -

AusGamers: There's a very British and dry sense of humour throughout all of Rare's history.

Joe: For sure. With Sea of Thieves, how we do that in the modern age, and a very different game than something that Rare has made before has been interesting. We've got this multiplayer game. We give players the tools to almost create their own humour. So, firing stuff out of cannons, getting drunk, and um, being able to be sick, and throwing up into buckets and throwing up on each other. All those things. It's almost like the difference between improv comedy and stand-up comedy. A game that delivers the jokes to you and tells you the jokes and makes you smile is like a stand-up comedian. Whereas in improv comedy, it's very much situational and dependent on the kind of tools you're given. But it's still funny.


Click Here to Read Sea of Thieves – The Big Rare Interview
Friday, 8 September 2017
Post by KostaAndreadis @ 01:50pm 08/09/17 | 0 Comments
As a development studio Rare's output is the stuff of legend, dating all the way back to the 8-bit NES. And even before that too, when you factor in early home computing. But during the studio's time developing games for the Nintendo 64, and then Xbox, one thing was clear. It was pretty secretive in what information it revealed, and only then when it was ready.

Well, with the upcoming release of its shared-world pirate adventure Sea of Thieves that mindset has changed. Big time. In creating a world where players would shape their own stories, foster relationships, and be part of a community, this forced Rare to be more open. And engage with its fans and community during the development process.

As part of our recent, and lengthy chat with studio head, Craig Duncan, we discussed Sea of Thieves' development. And this very subject.


Craig Duncan: You know Rare’s history, which was really secretive and did everything in a bubble. So one thing was, 'hey, we need to be building a game in this way'. Like, we're going to go build a new IP, to do that in a very open, transparent way, and get a community involved who will actually help. [We need to] make sure we're building a game that people love and resonates with them, but also has this really nice side effect that people go on that development journey with you. And they kind of get that passion to understand what you're trying to do.

This is where the transparency comes in. We've been very open. Since we showed gameplay for the first time last E3 we've been very open with our community talking about, "Hey, this is some of the stuff we're thinking about, here's some of the stuff on the roadmap". And, as well as that, running these technical alpha play tests, where we have people come in and play and give us direct feedback on features, give us… (obviously we survey them when they play), so give us feedback on how much fun they thought it was, how buggy they thought it was. You know, some really, really good stuff.



Craig Duncan: The other thing we said from the very start, is this is all about players as the critical source. And we wanted -- the way games are made now, how you socialise your gameplay experiences, whether you're tweeting about them or streaming or making videos -- people share games very differently. We can't say, "Hey, we want to make a game where every time you play, it's magic and it's a different story and it's unique and it's your adventure". So you kind of put those two things together, and, really, you need to build a game with a community to go do that, because everyone can play our game in a completely different way. And our players do - some players are very aggressively motivated and want to go seek ships and steal treasure and kill other pirates. Some are very exploration motivated and want to go travel the world.

And some are very socially motivated, they just want to go have a good time and play a game with their friends, so socially they can just go and have some fun.


Click Here for the Full Interview
Wednesday, 11 January 2017
Post by KostaAndreadis @ 03:02pm 11/01/17 | 2 Comments
Sea of Thieves from Rare is definitely one of 2017's most interesting titles, but also one that we're still not sure how it will all work, and if there's more to it than roaming the seas in a group in the search for treasure. Or, for other ship to steal their booty. But even if that's all their is to it, it certainly still sounds great. And the latest developer video on the project delves into the game's unique co-op structure.

From a design perspective it sounds like there's a huge focus on teamwork in Sea of Thieves, with everything from sailing to digging up treasure chests requiring a few people working together to get the best outcome.

Check it out.



As an online multiplayer game we did notice one of the devs using the word 'quest' in the video, which leads us to believe that Sea of Thieves will also feature some more traditional game-y aspects in addition to the free-form exploration and piracy.

Plus, that amazing water.
Monday, 18 July 2016
Post by Steve Farrelly @ 05:34pm 18/07/16 | 0 Comments
If it's not on your radar yet, we need to tell you to stop what you're doing and take a closer look at Rare's new IP, Sea of Thieves. Seriously. Because it's one of the most fun games we've had the pleasure of playing, and we were also lucky enough to have a chat with the notoriously reclusive studio about their new endeavour.

The setup is simple -- party with five people, man a ship and take to the high seas to do almost anything you want, including battling teams of other players. Find treasure, make people walk the plank, fight undead skeletons, escape the jaws of sharks, fight a kraken and do it all however you see fit.

Sea of Thieves is an emergent multiplayer beast that redefines player-driven gameplay. Here's a snippet from our chat with the games' design director Gregg Mayles and its executive producer Joe Neate.
Honestly, Sea of Thieves was probably the game I had the most fun with at E3, and I only played roughly 15-minutes of it, but it’s packed with potential. The game is a series of systems and opportunities, which then require the player to determine how they all work together. Actually, scratch that. It’s not the “player”, it’s players.

“It’s a shared-world experience; a shared adventure game,” adds executive producer Joe Neate. “And what that really means is that every time you see a set of sails in the distance, that’s another group of players and you’re not really sure what their intentions are -- are they going to come at you? Do they maybe need help? Do they want to parlay, or trade, or anything else?”

It’s best described as a kind of co-operative experience, with a team-based competitive side, as well as a personal progression component. You’re sort of forced to play together and perform individual roles, specifically on ships, but as a pirate it’s not a hard and fast ruleset -- you get to play the game how you like.
Click here for our complete Sea of Thieves interview feature.