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Game companies in Sydney
Cronoz
Sydney, New South Wales
1 posts
Hello everyone,

I am a computer science student and I am planning on doing an internship at a game company in Sydney. Most of the game companies are located in Melbourne and Canberra. However, those cities are not an option for me. So far I've found these companies which are located within Sydney:

Micro Forté
BigWorld
nextgengaming
Boom Interactive
Sony Australia
3RDsense Australia
Team Bondi
designworxz
Epiphany Games
Viva La Mobile

Do any of you guys know any other companies?

Thanks in advance.
11:22pm 16/04/10 Permalink
system
Internet
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11:22pm 16/04/10 Permalink
ravn0s
Brisbane, Queensland
9853 posts
11:23pm 16/04/10 Permalink
Cronoz
Sydney, New South Wales
2 posts
11:24pm 16/04/10 Permalink
Khel
Melbourne, Victoria
14657 posts
Bigworld is part of Micro Forte, and Team Bondi is thinly disguised slave labour (even more so than the rest of the games industry), but thats about all the info I can offer :(
11:39pm 16/04/10 Permalink
Crizane Tribal
Brisbane, Queensland
3048 posts
What exactly do you want to do in game development, Cronoz? Are you keen to get into the industry or just do an internship in the field out of interest and then take your computer science degree off into something more serious?
12:03am 17/04/10 Permalink
Cronoz
Sydney, New South Wales
3 posts
What exactly do you want to do in game development, Cronoz? Are you keen to get into the industry or just do an internship in the field out of interest and then take your computer science degree off into something more serious?

My goal is to work in the games industry as a programmer. An internship at a game company would get me more work experience and boost my portfolio.

I haven't decided on a specific programming principle(AI, animation, graphics etc.). However, I do have experience in those fields.
05:57am 17/04/10 Permalink
Tollaz0r!
Brisbane, Queensland
10444 posts
Go AI.

Animation and graphics are at a good standard now and wont advance as fast as AI could. With multiple-core CPU's becoming the norm there will be more and more spare CPU cycles that can be used for AI.

Also, if you specialise in AI and have trouble with the games industry there is always the robotics industry.
06:54am 17/04/10 Permalink
pixem
Sydney, New South Wales
247 posts
Whilst the list is game companies, game developers are probably not as much as that, you might find a lot of these listed are actually just publishers/distributors so they will have no real dev and be like any other retail company really.
08:12am 17/04/10 Permalink
Crizane Tribal
Brisbane, Queensland
3049 posts
What Tollaz0r said ^

AI for sure. Have you studied AI much over the course of your degree? It's a pretty complex field, but is becoming increasingly more useful. Not only is there robotics as already mentioned, but there is an increasing number of every day devices that include some primitive form of AI, and this will increase over coming years. Air conditioners that react to an array of environmental changes are a good example of this. More and more devices are going to start learning from and reacting to how we use them in increasingly more complex ways.

Engine programming has always been interesting to me, but I lack the coding skillz to get into it at the moment. I can read through the code for the games I have worked on and get what's going on... I just can't produce that kind of thing myself.
11:24am 17/04/10 Permalink
Tollaz0r!
Brisbane, Queensland
10447 posts
The US Navy use an AI service called IDA that basically assigns and distributes personal according to the constantly changing needs of the US Navy.

It has 'conscious' and 'sub-conscious' levels of thinking. Closest thing to Skynet that I've heard of :D

There is plenty of application in the AI field and the area is going to boom over the next few years and computational power increases and as people warm to the idea of letting the computer decide on highly complex tasks.

Learning AI that is.
01:32pm 17/04/10 Permalink
Khel
Melbourne, Victoria
14661 posts
I haven't decided on a specific programming principle(AI, animation, graphics etc.). However, I do have experience in those fields


Unless you're working for an absolutely massive development company, with hundreds of programmers (I'm talking about companies like Epic or Blizzard) then you're probably never going to be doing something so specialised as just AI. For an example, at my last job, I did everything from gameplay programming, to network programming, to AI, to collision systems and physics.

The way I see it, the choice you should be thinking about as a programmer is do you want to be an engine programmer, a gameplay programmer, or a tools programmer. Engine programmer is doing all the low level stuff, working directly with the renderer, sound system, etc, down at the lowest level. Gameplay programmer is your higher up application level stuff, like making the gameplay mechanics, the AI, etc. And your tools programming is working on the content pipeline, level editors, game entity editors, helping get the stuff the artists make and the level builders make into the game, etc. Then theres also stuff like scripting, but thats hardly real programming :P

I mean, theres a little bit of overlap here and there between those areas, but generally they're pretty separate, you generally don't see someone who's an engine programmer jumping over and working on the game mechanics on another title. So just figure out which of those areas you want to fit into and go from there imo. Don't worry about specialising too much, you're going to be much more likely to get a job if you can do a bunch of different things than if you're specialised in one specific thing. Personally, I'm a gameplay programmer, and I love it, I guess its sort of the role where you feel most like you're making a game. As an engine programmer you're more building technology than building a game (granted its very game oriented technology), but I just find gameplay programming much more satisfying. Each to their own though, I know guys who absolutely love making tools, and I couldn't imagine a more boring job!
03:57pm 17/04/10 Permalink
Vash
1763 posts
Doesn't AI programming require a degree in maths?
04:15pm 17/04/10 Permalink
WetWired
Brisbane, Queensland
4631 posts
if you have an inkling of artistic skill, go for a technical artist, half coder half artist, shaders, maya\max scripting etc
04:29pm 17/04/10 Permalink
thermite
Brisbane, Queensland
4873 posts
Doesn't AI programming require a degree in maths?


Most qualified programmers have done the relevant mathematics. AI really is only as complicated as you want to make it anyway, and apart from knowledge of syntax and the required program structure all you need is the theory of your approach to the solution and to be able to think things through, not as insurmountable as people make it out to be. After all it's just making computers solve problems more like you yourself would, rather than predefining everything.
04:49pm 17/04/10 Permalink
system
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04:49pm 17/04/10 Permalink
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