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Post by Dan @ 10:17am 21/03/12 | 0 Comments
Another interesting games-related patent has been spotted this week, as Microsoft R&D lays claim to some new technology intended to pack a 2560 x 2048 pixel display into an incredibly dorky looking helmet for head-mounted Xbox gaming.

patentbolt (via: CVG) reports that this theoretical device would use some manner of laser projection to allow for a very compact display while meeting the minimum distance requirement that an object needs to be away from the human eye in order to focus correctly. The proposed solution should be obvious to even the most dim-witted individual who holds an advanced degree in hyperbolic topology:
Technically speaking, the projector comprises a laser configured to form a narrow beam, first and second dilation optics, first and second redirection optics, and a controller. The first and second dilation optics each have a diffraction grating.

The first dilation optic is arranged to receive the narrow beam and to project a one-dimensionally dilated beam into the second dilation optic. The second dilation optic is arranged to receive the one-dimensionally dilated beam and to project a two-dimensionally dilated beam, which provides the virtual image.

The first and second redirection optics are each operatively coupled to a transducer. The first redirection optic is arranged to direct the narrow beam into the first dilation optic at a first entry angle. The second redirection optic is configured to direct the one-dimensionally dilated beam into the second dilation optic at a second entry angle. The controller is configured to bias the transducers to vary the first and second entry angles.
Read patenbolt's full detailed article for even more info.

Obviously patents like this are mostly just a giant company protecting the fruits of their R&D investments, but it would be nice to see some more leaps in the head-mounted display area -- as long as they can get the form-factor down to something smaller than an aviator helment.



microsoftxboxpatent





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