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Post by Steve Farrelly @ 04:18pm 28/11/11 | 3 Comments
A little while ago we reported that former Team Bondi boss, Brendan McNamara, was attempting to put L.A. Noire, and all of its dirty laundry, behind him to focus on pitching a new game.

"[It's] one of the great untold stories of the twentieth century," he told Eurogamer in an interview. "Hopefully I'll have something to announce on that pretty soon."

Thanks to the Australian Financial Review, however, said announcement has been circumvented by the company who actually bought into McNamara's new project: Kennedy Miller Mitchell (thanks GameSpot AU).

The article is a lengthy one, but sees Mad Max co-creator, George Miller and business partner, Doug Mitchell, calling on the Australian government to offer greater tax incentives to the videogame industry as an extension of existing tax breaks for the film industry.

"With the government's support we can immediately go forward with two games," Mitchell explained to the AFR. "Warner Bros is standing by, willing to do [Mad Max] Fury Road; the incentive would bring it back here in a New York minute. It's not immediately obvious but the potential in the videogames sector is massive. Just from the statistics people are showing me, it's a $60 billion industry fast-tracking towards $90 billion. And it's not dominated by any particular country."

"They’ll make 10 films where they used to make 20," he adds in explaining the difference in investment and return between games and films. "So, instead, people are drifting to game acquisition because of the budgets. The cost of a film may be $170 million –- twice that to market it –- whereas the basic cost of making a game might be 10 per cent of that. Look at LA Noire, they sold about 3 million units in a week, about $US135 million ($130 million) net revenue, off a cost base which was infinitely lower than even your average low-budget film."

The article outs McNamara's new project by name only; no other details are shared, though it's equally interesting to know Warner Bros. Interactive and KMMI are looking into a videogame adaptation of Mad Max: Fury Road - the long overdue fourth Mad Max film.

We'll try and do some digging (given KMM is just around the corner from me), and see what we can't surface on any of these revelations. What is great is knowing that beyond the videogames industry, insular, other larger entertainment branches are lobbying for change to the current model, which has seen the untimely and unfortunate deaths of many a great studio.

Game development in Australia might have a silver lining, after all.












Latest Comments
blahnana
Posted 05:23pm 28/11/11
Yeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaah
Steve Farrelly
Posted 05:27pm 28/11/11
way to break thread Blah
Grundar
Posted 11:44pm 29/11/11
Ah I love Mad Max, Mad Max 2, amazing (even if in the US they refer to it as The Road Warrior) :P Remember the old Max Max game for the old Mega Drive (and possibly SNES)? IT was exactly Max Max then the licence was pulled and they released it as Wastelander? or something similar iirc. Was quite fun putting the shotty out the passenger window and eliminating those punks, getting out of the car to shoot some punks for petrol and other punk-discriminatory like actions.

It's good to see George throw out some support for what amounts to a related entertainment industry, it can hopefully only mean good things for Australian developers, of course unless a certain someone is your boss and then, well, lets hope history doesn't repeat itself.
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