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Post by Dan @ 03:41pm 13/10/10 | 1 Comments
Some gamers were up in arms after the recent rumour wildly propagated that not only were they [Blizzard] bringing down the banhammer on StarCraft 2 players caught cheating in multiplayer, but also some that were only using third-party cheat applications for the single-player content too.

Blizzard typically responded to their community to clarify and reaafirm their position on the situation, which, it would seem, also confirms they have actually taken into account a number of gamers utilising said third-party tools for the single-player, despite no negative affect on the multiplayer:
"Blizzard Entertainment is not banning StarCraft II players just for using single-player cheats. There's been some confusion in the last couple of days about the suspensions and bans meted out to players caught cheating in StarCraft II. It's important to point out first, that many of the 3rd-party hacks and cheats developed for StarCraft II contain both single- and multiplayer functionality. In order to protect the integrity of multiplayer competition, we are actively detecting cheat programs used in multiplayer modes whether there are human opponents or not.

That said, players who opt to use any type of 3rd party hacks do so at their own risk — there are already built-in cheat codes for StarCraft II single-player that can be used safely. Blizzard Entertainment has always taken cheating seriously and will continue to aggressively crackdown on players who cheat in our games."
While this company line appears somewhat reasonable, it renews the debate on how much control consumers should have over the games they buy. Some would argue that Blizzard have the right to protect the integrity of their service, but others might say that the issue here is Blizzard's own fault for requiring such hard-line online authentication for the solo play content in the first place.



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Dan
Posted 03:41pm 13/10/10
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